Seasons: Autumn

Animal: Antelope, Deer, Elk, Goose, Hare, Hawk (sparrowhawk), Lynx, Moose, Porcupine, Quail, Snake, Turkey

Celebrations: Mabon, Samhain

Colors: Black, Brown, Gold, Orange, Red, Yellow

Days: September 22nd – 23rd – December 20th – 22nd (depending on year)

Direction: Northwest, West

Elements: Water

Gods: Dionysus

Minerals: Sapphire, Topaz, Tourmaline, Zircon (red)

Plants: Grapes, Ivy

Tarot: Cups

Zodiac: Libra, Sagittarius, Scorpio

Issues, Intentions, & Powers: Abundance, Accomplishment, Battle/War, Death, Goals, the Home, Magic (crone), Manifestation, Money, Sorrow, Transformation

– Alfrún

Celebrations: Mabon

The holiday of the autumnal equinox, Harvest Home, Mabon, the Feast of the Ingathering, Meán Fómhair or Alban Elfed (in Neo-Druid traditions), is a Pagan ritual of thanksgiving for the fruits of the earth and a recognition of the need to share them to secure the blessings of the Goddess and the God during the coming winter months. The name Mabon was coined by Aidan Kelly around 1970 as a reference to Mabon ap Modron, a character from Welsh mythology. Among the sabbats, it is the second of the three Pagan harvest festivals, preceded by Lammas / Lughnasadh and followed by Samhain. Mabon is also known as the “Witches’ Thanksgiving”. Continue reading

Celebrations: Lughnasadh

Lughnasadh or Lughnasa is a Gaelic festival marking the beginning of the harvest season. Historically, it was widely observed throughout Ireland, Scotland and the Isle of Man. Originally it was held on 1 August, or about halfway between the summer solstice and autumn equinox. However, over time the celebrations shifted to the Sundays nearest this date. Lughnasadh is one of the four Gaelic seasonal festivals; along with Samhain, Imbolc and Beltane. It corresponds to other European harvest festivals such as the Welsh Gwyl Awst and the English Lammas. Continue reading